Personal Finance Tips for Millennials

Unfortunately, personal finance has not yet become a required subject in secondary schools or Universities, so you might be fairly clueless about how to manage your money when you’re out in the real world for the first time.

 

To help you get started, we’ll take a look at eight of the most important things to understand about money if you want to live a comfortable and prosperous life.

 

  1. Learn Self-Control

If you’re lucky, your parents taught you this skill when you were a kid. If not, keep in mind that the sooner you learn the fine art of delaying gratification, the sooner you’ll find it easy to keep your finances in order. Although you can effortlessly purchase an item on credit the minute you want it, it’s better to wait until you’ve actually saved up the money.

 

 

  1. Take Control of Your Own Financial Future

If you don’t learn to manage your own money, other people will find ways to (mis)manage it for you. Some of these people may be ill-intentioned, while others may be well-meaning, but may not know what they’re doing, like that friend of yours who really wants you to buy a car even though you can’t afford it for now.

 

Instead of relying on others for advice, take charge and read a few basic books on personal finance. Once you’re armed with personal finance knowledge, don’t let anyone catch you off guard – whether it’s a significant other that slowly siphons your bank account or friends who want you to go out and blow tons of money with them every weekend. Understanding how money works is the first step toward making your money work for you.

 

  1. Know Where Your Money Goes

Once you’ve gone through a few personal finance books, you’ll realize how important it is to make sure your expenses aren’t exceeding your income. The best way to do this is by budgeting. Once you see how your Pizza and Ice cream adds up over the course of a month, you’ll realize that making small, manageable changes in your everyday expenses can have just as big of an impact on your financial situation as getting a raise.

 

In addition, keeping your recurring monthly expenses as low as possible will also save you big bucks over time.

 

  1. Start an Emergency Fund

One of the often-repeated mantras of personal finance is “pay yourself first.” No matter how low your salary may seem, it’s wise to find some amount – any amount – of money in your budget to save in an emergency fund every month.

 

Having money in savings to use for emergencies can really keep you out of trouble financially and help you sleep better at night. Also, if you get into the habit of saving money and treating it as a non-negotiable monthly “expense,” pretty soon you’ll have more than just emergency money saved up: you’ll have retirement money, vacation money and even money for a home down payment.

 

Don’t just sock away this money under your mattress; put it in a high-interest savings account, a fixed deposit or a money market account. Otherwise, inflation will erode the value of your savings.

 

  1. Start Saving for Retirement Now

Just as you headed off to kindergarten with your parents’ hope to prepare you for success in a world that seemed eons away, you need to prepare for your retirement well in advance. Because of the way compound interest works, the sooner you start saving, the less principal you’ll have to invest to end up with the amount you need to retire and the sooner you’ll be able to call working an “option” rather than a “necessity.”

 

Company-sponsored retirement plans are a particularly great because companies will often match part of your contribution, which is like getting free money.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: investopedia.com

 

 

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